Harrison County Health Department
L-R Seated: Rita Krueger, Rhonda Stuart, Autumn Wiley, Sharon Miles, Sarah Linthacum
2nd Row: Tonya Seiter, Courtney Cross, Gayle Guess, Christy Erwin, Delcena Hamilton, Trent Willhite, Ryann Rosier, Charlotte Gregg, Emily Jacobs
3rd Row: Alisha Noble, Fred Lindsey
The Health Department's open office day will be changing from Friday to Thursday beginning 1 Jan 2015! Open office day is the day that we always have a nurse in office for immunizations or nail clipping, etc. Please pass the word. Thank you and Happy Holidays from Harrison County Health Department! Also, we will be closed on Nov 27th and 28th in observance of Thanksgiving!
The students of all Harrison County schools along with the Harrison County Health Department take great pride in our future and our health. Together we show our community pride by working towards a healthier, smoke free generation for those younger students who look to us to set a good example, and not starting to smoke is the healthy thing to do. We know that more Americans die each year from smo...king-related diseases that from AIDS, alcohol, car accidents, fires, illegal drugs, murders and suicides combined and most importantly it’s just not cool!
The Amercian Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout is held the third Thursday in November to encourage young people not to start a lifetime of addiction to nicotine. Please join us in making Harrison County “smoke-free” for the day on November 20th. We urge all patrons to join our efforts in not allowing smoking in their businesses, school grounds, restaurants, public areas, city offices, etc… Show our younger generation we are here to support their efforts in making our great county a smoke free place to live!

Here are our partners in the Great American Smokeout!
Kum and Go - Bethany
Firehouse 54 - Eagleville
Bethany Martial Arts and Fitness - Bethany
Hy-Vee - Bethany
Cameron Medical Regional Medical Clinic - Eagleville, Bethany, Gilman City
McCall Dentistry
Little Clara's Garden
For information on Ebola please contact your local Health Department or the Centers for Disease Control.

For information about Alzheimers use these links:

www.alz.org and www.alzheimers.gov



Contact:

Contact: Courtney Cross, Administrator

Contact Number: 660-425-6324

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 16, 2014

Increase in Respiratory Illness Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68): What you need to know

In response to increasing numbers of respiratory illness (Enterovirus D68), the Harrison County Health Department wants you to know the facts so you can protect your family.

Enterovirus is a common virus.  With more than 100 types of enteroviruses, an estimated 10 to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year.  Most people who are infected with enteroviruses have no or mild symptoms.  However some enteroviruses, like Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), can be very serious.

Symptoms of the Enterovirus D68 are similar to the common cold.  Severe symptoms are possible with EV-D68, such as difficulty breathing. Children with cold like symptoms that experience difficulty breathing should consult their family physician. 

Enterovirus D68 appears to be spreading by close contact with infected people.   There is no vaccine or antiviral medication to treat EV-D68. 

The Harrison County Health Department provides the following recommendations to prevent the spread of EV-D68 and to also protect yourself and your family:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom or changing diapers.  The use of soap and water is very important to combat EV-D68.  Soap and water are the preferred method of hand washing.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.

  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick

  • If you are sick, stay home.

Your Local Public Health Department continues to monitor the situation and share information with local health providers.  While there are reports of increased cases across several Midwest states, there is not a surveillance system that can account for exact numbers of infections.

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Senior Epidemiology Specialist C. Jon Hinkle says, “Using good hand hygiene, practicing good cough and sneeze etiquette and staying home if you are sick are the most effective tools to fight EV-D68.”

For more information on EV-D68 visit http://www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/EV-D68.html or contact the Harrison County Health Department at 660-425-6324.

 

Courtney Cross, Administrator

Contact Number: 660-425-6324

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 16, 2014

Increase in Respiratory Illness Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68): What you need to know

In response to increasing numbers of respiratory illness (Enterovirus D68), the Harrison County Health Department wants you to know the facts so you can protect your family.

Enterovirus is a common virus.  With more than 100 types of enteroviruses, an estimated 10 to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year.  Most people who are infected with enteroviruses have no or mild symptoms.  However some enteroviruses, like Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), can be very serious.

Symptoms of the Enterovirus D68 are similar to the common cold.  Severe symptoms are possible with EV-D68, such as difficulty breathing. Children with cold like symptoms that experience difficulty breathing should consult their family physician. 

Enterovirus D68 appears to be spreading by close contact with infected people.   There is no vaccine or antiviral medication to treat EV-D68. 

The Harrison County Health Department provides the following recommendations to prevent the spread of EV-D68 and to also protect yourself and your family:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom or changing diapers.  The use of soap and water is very important to combat EV-D68.  Soap and water are the preferred method of hand washing.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.

  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick

  • If you are sick, stay home.

Your Local Public Health Department continues to monitor the situation and share information with local health providers.  While there are reports of increased cases across several Midwest states, there is not a surveillance system that can account for exact numbers of infections.

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Senior Epidemiology Specialist C. Jon Hinkle says, “Using good hand hygiene, practicing good cough and sneeze etiquette and staying home if you are sick are the most effective tools to fight EV-D68.”

For more information on EV-D68 visit http://www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/EV-D68.html or contact the Harrison County Health Department at 660-425-6324.

 

A new Chronic Disease Self Management Class is starting Wednesdays at the Harrison County Health Department from 9-11 AM from October 15th-November 19th. Call MU extension office or Harrison County Health Department for questions or to sign up.
Mosquito News: West Nile Virus is on the rise again. Read below to help prevent catching it!
The best way to prevent WNV disease is to prevent mosquito bites.  *Use insect repellents when you go outdoors (should have DEET, Picaridin, Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus or PMD or IR3535). *Wear long sleeves and pants during dawn and dusk, * Repair or install screens on windows and doors, *Use A/C, *Remove mosquito sources from around your home-empty rain gutters, flowerpots, old tires, empty containers, buckets and wading pools; water in birdbaths should be changed weekly.  CDC provides resources that list these and other steps for reducing mosquito populations @ (www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile.qa/habitats.htm).
Please see our new Privacy Act Statement linked below!

Our mission at the Harrison County Health Department is to protect and promote quality of life and health for county residents by developing and implementing programs and systems that provide:  information and education; effective oversight; quality services; and surveillance of diseases and conditions. 

 

Our vision is of healthy Harrison County residents that live in an environment that is safe, supportive, and conducive to a healthy lifestyle.

 

The Harrison County Health Department values a work environment and programs characterized by consistency, honesty, responsiveness and trust.  We are concerned, dedicated professionals who are adaptable in a rapidly changing environment.  Above all, we respect our customers, and maintain for them the highest standards of service.

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